Here’s 10 Things You Can Do To Help The Standing Rock Sioux Fight The Dakota Access Pipeline


If you haven’t heard what’s going on in Dakota, then you can’t be angry about it. And you should be.

 from Find Your Way Home gives this description of events:

“One of the most important actions of our time is taking place right now.  The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, and thousands of Native and non-Native allies are peacefully camping near the junction of the Cannonball and Missouri Rivers, to protect the water from contamination.  These are the waters that the Tribe relies on for its water supply.  Water is life, water is sacred. This is a non-violent gathering to pray and to stand up for life, named the Camp of the Sacred Stones.

But construction has already begun on the Dakota Access Pipeline, meant to carry fracked crude oil from the Bakken plains through North and South Dakota and Iowa to Illinois where it will be refined. The plan is for the pipeline to go underneath the river, despite the risk that creates for the tribe and for millions of others who rely on the Missouri for water.”

And what is continuing to happen is unacceptable. Nick Bernabe from The Anti Media reports on what recently transpired over the weekend:

“Peaceful protests turned violent after security guards from G4S, a British mercenary group, unleashed dogs on the demonstrators, provoking a confrontation the media spun as violently aggressive on the part of those protesting. The scuffle ensued after construction workers allegedly destroyed sacred Native American burial sites. However, video from the scene tells a different story — one of provocation from proponents of pipeline security.”

“The activation of the National Guard is likely a backup measure as the pipeline company and protesters await a court decision that could give pipeline construction a green light, possibly causing further confrontation between law enforcement, mercenaries, and protesters. The National Guard has a long historyof violently crushing civil unrest in the United States.”

So what can we do? Well, whatever you decide to do, it has to be now. And it must be a voice of one- a collective speaking out against what is wrong. Here are a list of 10 things you can do right now to help the Standing Rock Sioux Nation, from Finding Our Way Home:

1. Call North Dakota governor Jack Dalrymple at 701-328-2200. You can leave a message stating your thoughts about this.

2. Sign the petition to the White House to Stop DAPL: https://petitions.whitehouse.gov/…/stop-construction-dakota…

3. Donate to support the Standing Rock Sioux at http://standingrock.org/…/standing-rock-sioux-tribe–dakot…/

4. Donate items from the Sacred Stone Camp Supply List:
http://sacredstonecamp.org/supply-list/

5. Call the White House at (202) 456-1111 or (202) 456-1414. Tell President Obama to rescind the Army Corps of Engineers’ Permit for the Dakota Access Pipeline.

6. Contribute to the Sacred Stone Camp Legal Defense Fund: https://fundrazr.com/d19fAf

7. Contribute to the Sacred Stone Camp gofundme account: https://www.gofundme.com/sacredstonecamp

8. Call the Army Corps of Engineers and demand that they reverse the permit: (202) 761-5903

9. Sign other petitions asking President Obama to stop the Dakota Access Pipeline. Here’s the latest to cross my desk – https://act.credoaction.com/sign/NoDAPL

10. Call the executives of the companies that are building the pipeline:

a. Lee Hanse
Executive Vice President
Energy Transfer Partners, L.P.
800 E Sonterra Blvd #400
San Antonio, Texas 78258
Telephone: (210) 403-6455
[email protected]

b. Glenn Emery
Vice President
Energy Transfer Partners, L.P.
800 E Sonterra Blvd #400
San Antonio, Texas 78258
Telephone: (210) 403-6762
[email protected]

c. Michael (Cliff) Waters
Lead Analyst
Energy Transfer Partners, L.P.
1300 Main St.
Houston, Texas 77002
Telephone: (713) 989-2404
[email protected]energytransfer.com


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One thought on “Here’s 10 Things You Can Do To Help The Standing Rock Sioux Fight The Dakota Access Pipeline

  • September 10, 2016 at 9:20 pm
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    Can I sign even though I.m not American? Thank you!

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